Book Review: The God of Small Things


The God of Small ThingsThe God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy | DOP: 1997| Publishers: Random House, IndiaInk| Get your Copy  Online 

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I’ve read the novel The God of Small Things (GST) multiple times but never ever wrote a review on it. We share a love-hate relationship and today is one of those days I’m in love with it, therefore, an attempt at a review It is one of those must reads, specially for Indian readers because it catapulted Indian Writing in English to the world literary scene again after a lull of 17 years, after Midnight’s Children (1980). A publication marvel translated into 20 foreign languages immediately after its release, a Booker Prize winner, loved by great critics … I can go on…there cannot be two opinions on this, it is a well written novel and it was an instant hit because of many of the a fore mentioned reasons.

What about GST? GST at the heart of it all is the story of the Ipe family of Ayemenem a small village in Kerala; how the Ipe Family fell apart after ‘the Terror’ rocked the family in the summer of 1969. The chapters which alternate between the past and the present 23 years apart narrate the story of its youngest generation, Rahel, Estha and Sophie; it is their story. But it is not only their story. It is the story of their parents Ammu, Baba, Chacko and Margaret Kochamma and their grandparents, Mammachi, Papachi and Baby Kochamma their servants, Velutha, Kochu Maria and their ancestors, about Kerala, its history, colonialism, missionaries, development, communist party, superstitions, revolutions, discrimination, injustice, violence and trauma. It is also a commentary on the 150-200 years of Kerala’s cultural life.

There is something for everyone in this book. So if you haven’t read it yet, highly recommended. if you don’t like it then I will empathize with you in my bad moods when I hate it

View all my reviews

PS: I hated it because I had to work on it for a project… therefore, moral of the story, never take up something you love to work continuously unless you are sure you will not hate it 😀

Cross posted @ Book Reviews, Guardian Book Reviews

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pins & ashes

An Aquarius Woman

23 thoughts on “Book Review: The God of Small Things”

    1. I too stay away from these award winning books… found the white tiger boring. AB finished it and found it a good read… lot of economics in it he said and some concepts.. I disliked GST during my first read… but loved it the second time and then went on to hate it again, then love it then hate it and now it’s a neutral feeling 😉

      Try it again if you have the book Renu, give it your full time, it demands such attention 🙂 it’s written well 🙂

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  1. I am one of those who could not appreciate it. Read some 15 pages and gave up 😦
    Let me see if I muster the courage to pick it up again!

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    1. Muster the courage DI, from personal experience, such boring reads turn out to be interesting after the 5 or 6th time 😀 … Regarding this novel, the first chapter sums it all.. the rest of the chapters expand on it. Give it another try!

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  2. Well I haven’t read the book so nothing much to say on that but I soo soo sooo love your header…. Every time you come up with something better….

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  3. Read it – cover to cover and if someone asked me to summarize i would say i dont like it. but i get what you say about the mood thing – Some parts like the relationships between people etc makes u want to read it again and again…

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    1. Mmmmm it has that affect. One cannot completely dismiss this book… you’ll love parts of it at least because there are places where she has written beautifully 🙂 But the hype can cause a fall in expectations too!

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  4. //history, colonialism, missionaries, development, communist party, superstitions, revolutions, discrimination, injustice, violence and trauma. It is also a commentary on the 150-200 years of Kerala’s cultural life.// Completely agree. I loved the book too and am surprised when somebody says they don’t. There’s so much in this one book, like you said, there’s something for everybody.

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